Hand and Arm Signals

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Last updated: May 31, 2019

UNITED STATES MARINE CORPS WEAPONS TRAINING BATTALION MARINE CORPS MARKSMANSHIP CENTER OF EXCELLENCE MARINE CORPS COMBAT DEVELOPMENT COMMAND QUANTICO, VIRGINIA 22134-5040 LESSON PLANS HAND AND ARM SIGNALS CMC. 26 COMBAT MARKSMANSHIP COACHES’ COURSE REVISED 02/07/2006 APPROVED BY _____________________________ DATE _______________ UNITED STATES MARINE CORPS WEAPONS TRAINING BATTALION MARINE CORPS MARKSMANSHIP CENTER OF EXCELLENCE MARINE CORPS COMBAT DEVELOPMENT COMMAND QUANTICO, VIRGINIA 22134-5040 INSTRUCTOR PREPARATION CHECKLIST ESSENTIAL DATA LESSON DESIGNATORCMC. 26LESSON TITLEHand and Arm Signals DATE PREPARED07 February 2006 TIME30 min METHODLecture and demonstration LOCATIONIndoor/outdoor classroom INSTRUCTORS REQUIREDOne and assistants as needed REFERENCESMCO P3570. 1 TRAINING AIDS/EQUIPMENTPaddle, clipboard, and slides sCMC.

26-1 – sCMC. 26-24 UNITED STATES MARINE CORPS WEAPONS TRAINING BATTALION MARINE CORPS MARKSMANSHIP CENTER OF EXCELLENCE MARINE CORPS COMBAT DEVELOPMENT COMMAND QUANTICO, VIRGINIA 22134-5040 DETAILED OUTLINE HAND AND ARM SIGNALS (ON CHART 1) INTRODUCTION (3 MIN) 1. GAIN ATTENTION.Verbal communication between the coach, shooters, and other range officials is difficult during live fire due to the noise generated on the range.

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Hearing protection worn by personnel further hinders verbal communication. To ensure that live fire activities are conducted effectively and efficiently, hand and arm signals are used to facilitate communication among coaches, block Noncommissioned Officers (NCOs), and the tower NCO. (ON CHART 2) 2. OVERVIEW. This lesson covers hand and arm signals used during live fire activities and the guidelines for their use.

3. INTRODUCE LEARNING OBJECTIVES.The Terminal Learning Objective and Enabling Learning Objective pertaining to this lesson are as follows: a. TERMINAL LEARNING OBJECTIVE. Given assigned shooters, ammunition, range supplies and equipment, targets, a range, and without reference aids conduct record firing procedures IAW MCO 3574. 2_ and MCO P3570. 1_.

(8530. 2. 4) b. ENABLING LEARNING OBJECTIVE. Without reference aids, use hand and arm signals to communicate with range personnel IAW Combat Marksmanship Coaches’ Course (CMCC) lesson plans. (8530. 2. 4b) 4.

METHOD. This lesson is taught in a classroom setting using lecture and demonstration. 5.EVALUATION. Students are evaluated on topics from this lesson with a comprehensive written examination. Performance is evaluated with a performance checklist CMC. 14-25a during, Day 1 –3 Rifle KD Firing Exercise – Live Fire Coaching. TRANSITION: Coaches and shooters must apply and use hand and arm signals consistently and clearly for effectiveness.

To ensure signals are noticed, use of the following guidelines is imperative. Shooters need to interpret signals correctly on the firing line, yet not be distracted by their use. BODY (25 MIN) (ON CHART 3) 1. (5 MIN) GUIDELINES FOR USING HAND AND ARM SIGNALS . Chain of Command. Due to the large numbers of shooters, range personnel, noise, and constant activity on the range during live fire activities, a systematic method for communication is vital.

This is especially true between the firing line and the tower to ensure signals are quickly and easily identified. To accomplish this, there is a communication chain among the coach, block NCO, and tower NCO. 1) The coach is responsible for monitoring his shooters. When a shooter has a problem, a coach may use hand and arm signals to communicate it to the block NCO assigned to his group of targets.

) The block NCO is responsible for monitoring his coaches. When a coach signals a problem on the line, the block NCO relays the signal to the tower NCO. If the block NCO corrects the problem, he does not signal the tower NCO. The block NCO should not attempt to signal the tower NCO while commands are given. 3) The tower NCO is responsible for observing the range personnel and shooters.

When one of them signals the tower NCO, the tower NCO notifies the pits to take appropriate action. b. Position on the Firing Line to Facilitate Signaling 1) Coach.When using hand and arm signals, step back from the ready line to avoid disturbing shooters and to allow the tower NCO to have an unobstructed view of signals. When there are a small number of firing points, the coach can signal directly to the tower NCO. However, when the firing unit is providing its own coaches, their experience level may make it preferable to allow the block NCO to signal the tower NCO. 2) Block NCO. The block NCO is positioned to the rear of his block of targets in a position where the tower NCO can easily see him.

c. Confirmation of Signal 1) The block NCO verbally confirms the coach’s signal once he nderstands the signal. The coach should monitor the target down range to ensure the situation is corrected. 2) The tower NCO confirms the block NCO’s signal by either pointing to the block or by verbal acknowledgement (for alibis and saved rounds).The block NCO should not lower his paddle or clipboard, until he receives confirmation of his signal by the tower NCO.

3) The tower NCO must remain aware that the block NCO may give more than one signal. The tower NCO must allow the block NCO time to complete all signals, before diverting his attention to the next block NCO. | |Confirm by questions. | TRANSITION: The hand and arm signals covered are used during practice, prequalification, and qualification firing on the KD Course of Fire.

Some of these signals are used on particular days of firing. During prequalification and qualification firing it is especially important that a coach is able to relay any information to the tower as quickly and clearly as possible. During live fire, the shooters are timed. Therefore, any delays in scoring or marking targets could have an adverse effect on the shooter and his performance.A coach must know when each of the hand and arm signals are used and the reasons behind them. (ON CHART 4) 2. (15 MIN) HAND AND ARM SIGNALS | | |INSTRUCTOR’S NOTE: Demonstrate the procedures | |in this lesson as they are explained. | a.

Coach. When hand and arm signals are required between the coach and the block NCO, the coach verbally notifies the block NCO and then provides the appropriate signal.Because the range coach is normally in proximity to the block NCO, he generally verbally communicates with the block NCO. If it is necessary to use hand and arm signals, the coach uses the same signals as the block NCO, but without the benefit of a paddle. The coach can instruct shooters to give appropriate signals as well. b. Block NCO.

Two devices are used in signaling to communicate to the tower NCO: the paddle and clipboard. 1) Use of Paddle. Some signals are given by displaying a paddle that is green on one side and red on the other.When facing the tower NCO, the block NCO’s arm closest to the firing line is considered the inside arm. To signal, the block NCO faces the tower, holds the paddle in his outside hand, and then raise his outside arm displaying the appropriate color to the tower. If the block’s signal is not observed in a reasonable amount of time, the block NCO verbally signals to the tower by calling “Tower. ” 2) Use of Clipboard. Most signals are given by displaying a clipboard with the appropriate target number printed on it.

The clipboard is held in the outside hand with the number facing the tower. ) The target number are always displayed during every signal. b) When the signal involves one arm crossing the other, the outside hand holding the clipboard is always crossed over the inside arm to avoid covering the target number. c) To signal for more than one target, both clipboards should be ready for use. Each firing point will have its own clipboard.

d) The block NCO should step away from the firing line, when signaling the tower to avoid distracting the shooters. c. Paddle Signals. The paddle is used by the block NCO to indicate when his block of targets has completed a command given by the tower NCO.The green side of the paddle is used to indicate the completion of all commands. Following the command “Load,” the tower NCO observes all the block NCOs to ensure their targets are ready before giving the command “Make Ready. ” Block NCOs will signal the tower NCO with a red paddle, if there is a problem completing a command or a requirement to call a cease-fire. Following the command “Make Ready,” the tower NCO observes all the block NCOs to ensure their targets are ready before communicating to the pits to raise the targets.

(ON CHART 5) ) Line is Ready or Clear. To signal that shooters are ready to fire or ready to move off the firing line, the block NCO raises his outside arm to shoulder level with the green side of the paddle facing the tower, and waits for confirmation from the tower NCO. (ON CHART 6) 2) Line is Not Ready or Not Clear. To signal that shooters are not ready to fire or have not cleared their weapons, the block NCO raises his outside arm to shoulder level with the red side of the paddle facing the tower, and waits for confirmation from the tower NCO. (ON CHART 7) 3) Cease Fire.To signal for a cease-fire, the block NCO raises his outside arm to shoulder level and bends his arm up at a 90-degree angle. Then, with the red side of the paddle facing the tower, he swings the paddle in front of his face several times, while verbally calling “Cease Fire” and waits for confirmation from the tower NCO. (ON CHART 8) 4) Range Officer or Range Safety Officer (RSO).

To signal for a range officer or RSO, the block NCO raises the paddle above his head, green side toward the tower, and waves the paddle in a circle. d. Clipboard Signals.

In all of the following clipboard signals, the clipboard is held in the outside hand. | |NOTE: To reduce the coaches’ workload, the coach may authorize shooters to call | |for marks on practice days. | (ON CHART 9) 1) Mark Target. If the shooter has fired and the target is not pulled into the pits for marking, signal the tower to relay this information to the pits. Raise your outside arm to shoulder level and wait for confirmation from the tower NCO. (ON CHART 10) 2) Re-disk. If the shooter or the scorekeeper did not see the disking of the target, signal the tower NCO to call the pits to re-disk the target.

Raise both arms to shoulder level and bend them up at a 90-degree angle. Wait for confirmation from the tower NCO. (ON CHART 11) 3) Change Spotter Size. If the shooter is having difficulty seeing the spotter or if the pit operator is using the wrong size spotter, signal the tower to change the size of the spotter. Raise your outside arm to shoulder level.

Signal the desired spotter size by raising your inside arm above your head and holding up the number of fingers to indicate the desired size (e. g. , 3” spotter, three fingers). On ranges where the tower NCO cannot see the target flanks, the block NCOs will verbally notify the towerNCO of the spotter size. Wait for confirmation from the tower NCO. (ON CHART 12) 4) Invert Spotter. If the spotter is misplaced on the target, white on white or black on black, call for the target to be pulled into the pits and the spotter inverted. Raise your outside hand over your head, turn the clipboard to the numbered side, and rotate it to its unnumbered side until your signal is confirmed by the tower NCO.

(ON CHART 13) 5) Crooked Target. If a target has fallen, is crooked, or is not secured in the target holder, signal the tower. The tower NCO will communicate to the pits to pull the target and repair it.Hold the clipboard in both hands and rock the clipboard from side to side in front of your stomach. Wait for confirmation from the tower NCO. (ON CHART 14) 6) Put Target in the Air.

If the shooter has not shot and the target is pulled into the pits, notify the tower NCO who will communicate to the pits to put the target back in the air. Raise your outside arm to shoulder level. Reach across your body with your inside arm, and with your thumb up and the rest of the hand in a fist, raise and lower your inside arm above and below the clipboard. Wait for confirmation from the tower NCO. (ON CHART 15) 7) Speed Up Target.If the pit operator is exceeding 20 seconds to pull, score, and raise the target, signal the tower NCO to notify the pits to speed up their pit service.

Raise your outside arm to shoulder level and bend it up at a 90-degree angle. Pump the clipboard up and down and wait for confirmation from the tower NCO. (ON CHART 16) 8) Half-Mast Target. Once the shooter has fired all of his rounds, the target may be pulled to half-mast. At this time, you may signal the tower to indicate the shooter has completed the string of fire. Raise your outside arm to shoulder level and bend your arm up at a 90-degree angle.

Wait for confirmation from the tower NCO. (Chart 17) 9) Call for Armorer. If there is a weapon malfunction that the shooter cannot clear, call for the armorer to help correct the problem. Hold the clipboard in both hands in front of your chest and wait for confirmation from the tower NCO. (ON CHART 18) 10) Slow Target. A slow target is called if a target was called for a mark and was pulled, scored, and raised in excess of 60 seconds. The shooter rates an additional one-minute for each saved round.

Cross your arms in front of your chest holding the clipboard in your hands. Then, wait for confirmation from the tower NCO. ON CHART 19) 11) Disregard. If the target was pulled and marked and the shooter did not fire a shot, call for that score to be disregarded. It is possible that the shooter in the next block cross-fired.

The score of that shot should not be counted. With your outside arm raised at a 90-degree angle, bring your inside hand from one side of your body to the other, directly under your chin. Wait for confirmation from the tower NCO. (ON CHART 20) 12) Rounds Recorded. If the target has not been pulled to half-mast after the shooter has completed firing, call for an identification of the number of rounds recorded on the target.Raise your outside arm to shoulder level and bend it up at a 90-degree angle. Extend your inside arm straight above your head and with your inside hand, open and close your fingers and wait for confirmation from the tower NCO.

(ON CHART 21) 13) Alibis. When the tower calls for alibis, signal the target numbers that have alibis. Pull out the target point box and then point at the box with your inside arm. If the range does not have boxes, raise your outside arm to a 45-degree angle. Wait for verbal confirmation from the tower NCO. (ON CHART 22) 14) Saved Rounds.After firing has ceased, the tower will call for the number of saved rounds for each shooter.

Wait until the tower calls for saved rounds before signaling how many each of your shooters has. Raise your outside arm to shoulder level. Pull the target point box and stand with your outside arm at a 45 degree angle holding the number of saved rounds. If your range does not have target point boxes, raise your inside arm straight above your head and pump your hand to indicate the number of rounds that were saved by that particular shooter. Wait for verbal confirmation from the tower NCO. (ON CHART 23) 15) 911 Call.

In the event of a gunshot wound, signal the tower. Raise both arms and cross them over your head. Wait for verbal confirmation from the tower NCO.

| | |Confirm by questions. | TRANSITION: Most of the hand and arm signals reviewed are appropriate only during KD firing. During field firing, only a few basic signals are required. However, during night firing, the application of these basic signals must be altered to accommodate the restrictions of this firing environment.

(ON CHART 24) 3. (5 MIN) APPLICATION OF HAND AND ARM SIGNALS DURING TABLES 2,3,4 EXERCISES . Hand and Arm Signals During Field Firing. For field firing exercises, the coach and block NCO will use the same signals used during KD firing to include: 1) Line ready or not ready. 2) Line clear or not clear. 3) Cease fire.

b. Night Firing. During low-light and night firing, the ability to observe and identify hand and arm signals is difficult, if not impossible. To compensate for this limitation, illumination devices (e. g. , flashlights, chemlights) are used as signaling devices.

1) Coach. To signal that the line is not ready or not clear, or there is a problem on the line, use an illumination device. ) Do not extinguish the illumination device, until the signal has been confirmed by the block NCO.

b) If the block NCO has not extinguished his illumination device to confirm the signal, verbally call “Line ready or line clear. ” 2) Block NCO. To signal that the block is not ready or clear or there is a problem on the block, the block NCO does the following: a) When the block NCO observes a signal from one of his coaches, he signals the tower with an illumination device. This action also confirms to the coach that the block has recognized his signal. ) The block waits for confirmation of his signal from the tower. He does not extinguish his illumination device. Instead, he waits until he observes that the line is ready or clear or he receives verbal notification from the coach that the line is ready or clear. c) If the block NCO has been signaled by more than one coach in his block, he will not extinguish his illumination device.

He waits until all block coaches have indicated that their line is ready or clear. 3) Tower NCO. To confirm a signal from a block NCO, the tower NCO proceeds with the appropriate commands.

The tower NCO should not proceed with commands, until he has observed the block NCO extinguish his illumination device. | | |Confirm by questions. | TRANSITION: Whether on a KD or field firing range, safe and efficient range operations depend in part on the effective use of hand and arm signals as a method of communication. As a range coach, you will have the responsibility to know the numerous hand and arm signals. You will also know how and when they are applied to ensure firing activities are conducted safely and efficiently. Chart 25) OPPORTUNITY FOR QUESTIONS: (1 MIN) 1.

Respond to questions from the class. 2. Prompt Marines with questions to the class. a.

QUESTION: Who is responsible for confirming a coach’s signal? ANSWER: The block NCO. b. QUESTION: How does the block NCO signal a “Cease Fire? ” ANSWER: By raising his outside arm to shoulder level and bending his arm up at a 90-degree angle. Then, with the red side of the paddle facing the tower, he will swing the paddle in front of his face several times while verbally calling “Cease Fire.

” c.QUESTION: During night firing, how would a coach signal his block NCO that there is a problem on the line? ANSWER: By using an illumination device. | | |INSTRUCTOR’S NOTE: Ask Marines as many questions | |as necessary to ensure they fully understand | |the material presented in this lesson. | (ON CHART 24) SUMMARY: (1 MIN)Hand and arm signals are essential for communication on the live fire range. Within the range chain of command, hand and arm signals permit a systematic method for relaying signals between the coach, the block NCO, and the tower.

This ensures that the signals are quickly relayed between the firing line and the tower. It also aids in swiftly correcting problems on the line with minimal distraction to the shooters. The ability of the range coach to apply hand and arm signals appropriately is a key factor in the conduct of effective live fire activities. SLIDES TABLE OF CONTENTS NUMBERTITLE

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