It initiative has to undergo a lifecycle before

It is indispensable to
have insights into what a business process actually means before comprehending the
definition of business process management (BPM) (Lusk, Paley, & Spanyi, 2005). Most
importantly, rather than looking at BPM as an approach to improve the efficiency
and effectiveness of individual business activities, BPM should be regarded as
managers’ attitude in handling or managing a collection of corporate business
processes whose outcome is of value to the concerned corporation and its
customers (Harmon, 2007). These business
processes refer to sequences of events, activities and decisions that cross
functional boundaries with the notion that they are dynamic and have a clear
sequencing of time (Gulledge & Sommer, 2002). As opposed to aiming
at particular products or services to be delivered to customers, BPM ? or a process
viewing of business ? highlights the ways to improve business activities being
performed (Liang & Cohen, 1994). According to Dumas, Rosa, Mendling, & Reijers (2013), “the way
processes are designed and performed affects both the quality of service that
customers perceive and the efficiency with which services are delivered”. In
other words, BPM is ultimately aimed at improving business processes, by means
of which customers satisfaction and fulfillment is maximized (Conger, 2010; Hammer, 1990; Rummler & Brache,
1991).

A new BPM initiative
has to undergo a lifecycle before a business process is successfully improved (Dumas et al., 2013; vom Brocke & Mendling, 2017;
Weske, 2012), encompassing the following six
major phases: (1) “process identification”
addressing a business problem and designing a new or updated process
architecture that provides an overall view of business processes and their
relationships; (2) “process discovery”
shifting the focus from multi-process to one specific process and producing its
detailed description and current state; (3) “process analysis” during which analytical tools and performance
measures determine process issues/weaknesses and their impact; (4) “process redesign” addressing the
identified issues through a reworked design for the process that is to be
implemented; (5) “process implementation”
characteristically covering information system implementation and measures to
facilitate organizational change; and (6) “process
monitoring and controlling” continually collecting and analyzing execution
data for their compliance with performance measures and objectives. Every good
process will eventually become a bad process, unless continuously adapted and
improved to keep up with the rapidly changing customer needs, technology and
competition (Hammer, 1990, 2007). Thus, the BPM
lifecycle is illustrated as a circular and continuing sequence of phases, in
which the output from the phase of “process monitoring and controlling” feeds
back into the phase of “process discovery”, “process analysis” and so forth (Dumas et al., 2013; vom Brocke & Mendling, 2017).

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A new BPM initiative
has to undergo a lifecycle before a business process is successfully improved (Dumas et al., 2013; vom Brocke & Mendling, 2017;
Weske, 2012), encompassing the following six
major phases: (1) “process identification”
addressing a business problem and designing a new or updated process
architecture that provides an overall view of business processes and their
relationships; (2) “process discovery”
shifting the focus from multi-process to one specific process and producing its
detailed description and current state; (3) “process analysis” during which analytical tools and performance
measures determine process issues/weaknesses and their impact; (4) “process redesign” addressing the
identified issues through a reworked design for the process that is to be
implemented; (5) “process implementation”
characteristically covering information system implementation and measures to
facilitate organizational change; and (6) “process
monitoring and controlling” continually collecting and analyzing execution
data for their compliance with performance measures and objectives. Every good
process will eventually become a bad process, unless continuously adapted and
improved to keep up with the rapidly changing customer needs, technology and
competition (Hammer, 1990, 2007). Thus, the BPM
lifecycle is illustrated as a circular and continuing sequence of phases, in
which the output from the phase of “process monitoring and controlling” feeds
back into the phase of “process discovery”, “process analysis” and so forth (Dumas et al., 2013; vom Brocke & Mendling, 2017).

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