The have seen during my 4-weeks voluntary work

The satisfaction obtained from improving an individual’s health is what inspires me to become a doctor. The interactive nature of medicine combined with the application of science is what strengthens my decision. Opting to study medicine is not a decision I have taken lightly. It’s the career I have wanted to do since a particularly young age. I have thought very long and hard before deciding to apply.

From what I have seen during my 4-weeks voluntary work at the Specialty Hospital in Amman, Jordan, Medicine is a tough career. I was then only 16 at the time, and the doctors wondered why I was taking that voluntary job.

That was an opportunity to observe and speak to doctors regarding a medical career. Whilst fleeting, my visits to the Hospital departments highlighted the variety and diversity of the fascinating specialties medicine encompasses. Dr. Masharawy, a Cardiologist entrusted me to translate some of the medical reports to his patients from English into Arabic. Before the translation, I had to understand what was scripted in those reports. The explanations I heard from this Cardiologist before conducting the translation, was a memorable medical education.

During my volunteering 4-weeks, I had a superb opportunity to observe medicine from another dimension. I observed the ward rounds, an MRI scan, and an endoscopy clinic, all of which I found interesting. I spent most of the time with the hematology team, and cardiology team. Thanks to Dr. Masharawy, that Cardiology became one of my supreme interests, and it was captivating that I could see the specialty from a more complex side than the AS biology course.

Throughout those 4-weeks, I was able to expand my communication skills and confidence in engaging with patients and doctors. That short experience ignited my interest in the medical career.

Although I enjoyed the 4-weeks, it was at times extremely heart-rending. I was able to get close to many of the terminally ill patients helping, caring and feeling for them to raise their spirits. The ease with which the doctors broached and dealt with sensitive subject matter also emphasized the importance of a warm, congenial approach and an ability to communicate within the level of understanding of their patients.

I participated in a camp for a week. The challenging conditions demanded teamwork and trust to perform effectively as a group. I was able to gain first aid qualifications… This experience was priceless, not only in terms of my future medical career but also in terms of developing leadership and creative thinking skills. We learned how to handle an emergency case; we were taught how to work together as a team. Consequently, my planned journey towards medical school will remain alive.

All my experience has made me more determined to accomplish my ambition to be a doctor. Other activities I enjoy include astronomy – I was the leader of our team. We participated in Qatar National Astronomy Olympiad. My project was helpful in winning the Olympiad.

My love of science and aspiration for a medical career is reflected in my AS-Level choices where good time management, self-motivated studying skills and ability to cope with stress and pressure are essential. Biology and chemistry have helped me further my interest and develop my analytical skills; Mathematics helped my problem-solving skills and working logically, while physics underpinned my scientific analysis and crucial understanding.

As I grew older, I considered restraining my dream of becoming a doctor. In addition to the unceasing encouragement of my academic advisor, and my friends, I started looking at the requirements of the universities and what qualities do a doctor has to have and the results were promising.

Looking back, I believe the personal qualities I have developed through my career may help me become a good doctor. During my free time, I enjoy reading and sports including basketball and cricket, for which I was captain of the school team, improving my leadership skills.

I know that medicine is by no means the glamorous source of easy money it is often perceived to be. I understand the working hours are long and potentially antisocial and that the career can be physically exhausting and emotionally draining. It is apparent that becoming a medic involves inherent sacrifice.

However, medicine is also a deeply gratifying and fascinating career path. I want to be a doctor because my passion and aptitude is foremost scientific and to me 5 or 6 years more of formal education followed by a lifetime of further learning sounds like a stimulating career option. Nevertheless, as an intrinsically social person, I would relish a career requiring the development of strong empathic relationships with my patients.

I look forward to the social and academic challenges of university. I am aware of the demands of a medical career but my dedication, commitment and desire to become a doctor has only been strengthened through my experience and work in a voluntary capacity.

                                                                          

 

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