The on God, and most of the songs

The
two spirituals that caught my attention were the religious spiritual and the blues.
The religious spirituals are mainly religious and specifically
sing about the greatness of the Almighty God. The spiritual mainly aimed at
giving slaves hope for a better future and brighter days. The spirituals would
tell of a day and time when slaves would be unshackled and become free. Slaves
sang these tunes throughout the day at their work stations, plantations and
farms. The songs provided the slaves with some form of mental escape from their
harsh and cruel reality. The Blues was another form of vernacular tradition
that African Americans also used to tell stories. The ability to use tales to
tell tales was a trait similar in the spirituals and The Blues. African
Americans told tales of their experience as slaves and their hope for
emancipation through spirituals and blues. The blues came to existence at a
time some slaves had begun to achieve their freedom, however, a majority of
them were still trapped in slavery (Quill, 2003). The religious spiritual and
blues are in some ways the same because as I mentioned before they both have to
deal with oral platforms of expression and the characteristic of telling tales
of success and accomplishment.  

One
main aspect of difference between the blues and spirituals was the awareness of
the directive of success. The spirituals enclosed a life of so much success and
achievement, considering the blues was more geared toward a more human and
realistic categorization of hope and success. The spirituals zoomed in on
gaining spiritual success and divine intervention. The blues, on the other hand,
focused on human accomplishments but the spirituals focused mainly on God, and
most of the songs mentioned God, the blues were civil. The blues did not reject
God, but instead targeted the joys and sorrows of life without mentioning God.
Another difference between the two forms is the association with the American
culture. The spirituals were composed of a blend of the African traditions and
practices with American traditional and religious practices. The slaves still
practiced their traditional religious beliefs that they carried from their
ancestral homes. The slaves inculcated these traditional practices into the
Spirituals. In contrast, the blues came at a time when slaves were becoming
liberated and receptive to the American culture (Quill, 2003).

In
conclusion, the two spirituals that caught my attention were the
religious spiritual and the blues.  Vernacular
traditional forms of expression such as religious spirituality and the blues
became common forms of expression among slaves. The African slaves used song
and dance to communicate to encourage and give hope to each other so that they
can overcome the slavery days. The vernacular traditions allowed the black
community to truly express what they felt in their heart and minds in only a
way that they could.

 

 

 

 

Works
Cited

Quill, C. (2003). The
history of the Blues. The Rosen publishing group. New York

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